Kathmandu Nepal

Kathmandu

The city is the urban core of the Kathmandu Valley in the Himalayas. The Kathmandu Valley is situated at an altitude of 1,350 m (4,400 ft) above sea level, and covers an area of 218 sq m (2,346 sq ft) surrounded by four major mountains, namely Shivapuri, Phulchowki, Nagarjun and Chandragiri. Neighbouring cities include Patan or Lalitpur towards the southeast (an ancient city of fine arts and crafts) and Bhaktapur or Bhadgaon to the east (City of Devotees). Kathmandu is the headquarters of the country’s Central Region. Kathmandu is easily accessible by road and air. The famous observation platform with its breathtaking views of the city is at the Swayambhunath Stupa in the Swayambhu area of the city, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is also known as Monkey Temple.

Special Attraction

Boudhanath Stupa:
Boudhanath Stupa is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  The 36 m (118 ft) high stupa is one of the largest stupas in South Asia.  With countless monasteries surrounding it, Bouddhanath is the centre of Buddhism in Nepal.  The stupa was renovated by Licchavi rulers in the eighth Century. 
Bhaktapur Durbar Square:This square is in the centre of Bhaktapur city.  Showcasing architecture that dates back to the Malla period, the square is particularly charming with wide open spaces that are off limits to vehicular traffic.  In Bhaktapur you will see some of the finest medieval art in Nepal.  Of particular interest are: the Golden Gate, the Fifty Five Window Palace and the beautiful statue of King Bhupatindra Malla mounted on a giant stone pillar.  The Golden Gate was erected by King Ranjit Malla as the entrance to the main courtyard of the Fifty Five Window Palace, which was built during the reign of King Yakshya Malla in 1427 AD and re-modelled by King Bhupatindra Malla in the seventeenth century.  The Art Gallery has a fascinating collection of ancient manuscripts, thankas, centuries old stone sculptures and antique paintings that belong to the Hindu and Buddhist traditions of various periods.  This gallery is open daily except on Tuesdays.
Changunarayan Temple:
Changunarayan temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  Dedicated to Lord Vishnu, it was built in the fourth century.  A fifth century stone inscription in the temple proclaims it as one of the oldest shrines in Kathmandu Valley.  The temple is a showcase for Newari art and the architecture of the early century, and the stone, wood, and metal craft found here is exemplary.  On the struts of the two-tiered Changu Narayan Temple are ten incarnations of Narayan.  A sixth century stone statue shows the cosmic form of Vishnu.  Garuda - half man and half bird - is the vehicle of Vishnu, and his life-size statue kneels before the temple.
Nagarkot :, Nagarkot is renowned for its sunrise view of the Himalayas (including Mount Everest) as well as other snow-capped peaks of the Himalayan range of eastern Nepal.  Nagarkot also offers a panoramic view of Kathmandu Valley.
National Museum:The National Museum of Nepal is located in Chauni, near Swayambhu.  The museum was initially known as Chhauni Silkhana, which literally means “the stone house of arms and ammunitions”.  Here, one can see Napoleon’s sword of command which was presented to Jung Bahadur, the Prime Minister and virtual ruler of Nepal from 1846 to 1877, who established the powerful Rana dynasty.
Narayanhiti Palace Museum:
The Narayanhiti Palace opened as a museum in February 2009; nine months after the abolition of the monarchy.  The museum currently showcases the belongings of former kings and other royals who lived at the palace.  Visitors can also see the diamond-studded crown, and the wardrobes of the former members of the Royal family.
Pashupatinath Temple:
This temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  The shrine is dedicated to Lord Shiva, and is one of the four most important religious sites in Asia for devotees of Shiva.  Built in the fifth century and later renovated by Malla kings, the site itself is said to have existed from the beginning of the millennium when a Shiva lingam was discovered in the forest.  The main pagoda-style temple has a gilded roof, four sides covered in silver and wood carvings of the finest quality.  Only Hindus are allowed inside the gates of the main temple. The temple is open from 6:00am until 7:00 pm.
Kathmandu Durbar Square:Kathmandu Durbar Square is in the heart of old Kathmandu city in Basantapur.  It was once the residence of Nepal's Royal family, and all coronation ceremonies were held here.  The palace is an amalgamation of Eastern and Western architecture, with additions by Rana and Shah Rulers over the centuries.  An unbelievable fifty temples lie within the vicinity, including the temple of the titular deity, Taleju Bhawani.  The Durbar is divided into two courtyards, the outer Kasthamandap, Kumari Ghar: home of the Living Goddess and Shiva-Parvati Temple, and the inner section consisting of Hanuman Dhoka and the main palace.  Some floors have been converted to museums dedicated to three generations of Shah Kings.  Most parts of the palace premises are open to tourists throughout the week.
Patan Durbar Square:Patan Durbar Square is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, located in the heart of Patan city and was once the palace of the kings of Patan.  The square is a display of Newari architecture that had reached its pinnacle during the reign of Malla kings; who were great builders and patrons of the arts.  The palace has three main courtyards, the most central (and the oldest) is Mul Chowk.  To the west of the complex are a dozen free-standing temples of various sizes, built in different styles.  A masterpiece in stone, the Krishna Temple, Bhimsen Temple, the Golden Temple of Hiranya Varna Mahavira and Sundari Chowk mark the artistic brilliance of the Newari craftsmen of that era.  The Sundari Chowk - with the sunken bath of Tusha Hiti - showcases exquisite woodcarvings, stone and metal sculptures.  Like the other palaces, Patan Durbar Square also houses a temple dedicated to Taleju Bhawani.


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